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Must See LA Landmarks
2000 Avenue of the Stars Los Angeles, CA 90067 United States
1 2000 Avenue of the Stars
Must See LA Landmarks
The 2000 Avenue of the Stars building is a redevelopment of the former ABC Entertainment Center complex in Century City and consists of 720,000 square feet of class A office space, 45,000 square feet of restaurant and amenity retail, a 10,000-square-foot cultural program, and a redesigned open park space four acres in size. The entire development is located above a six-level subterranean parking garage and is part of a super block that includes the Minoru Yamasaki-designed Century Plaza Towers. The redeveloped property connects the site with Century City—the Century City Mall, the Century Plaza Hotel, and nearby office buildings—in a way it never has before. 
In keeping with the progressive vision for the project, an important mandate for the building design was to incorporate energy-saving features and mitigate any environmental impacts. The team performed an energy consumption analysis in coordination with the developer and the environmental agencies to evaluate potential environmental impact. The studies compared the projected utility usage for the new building against the history of utility consumption of the old buildings, demonstrating an energy savings of 16%. The building utilizes water saving features that will provide 20% savings in annual water consumption. Although the client chose not to pursue LEED certification, the 2000 Avenue of the Stars building envelope is, without a doubt, the most energy-efficient design in the Century City area due to double-glazed, low-E glass with a shading coefficient of 0.34.
A 30-foot grade difference between the base of the new building and the Century Plaza Towers provided space for the four-acre Centerpiece Park. The park slopes down from 2000 Avenue of the Stars to Century Plaza Towers, but the final grade is 5 percent, which provides a comfortable transition that meets ADA compliance. The new green space is an inviting destination for the professionals who work in the surrounding office buildings, their visitors and the community at large. A project goal from start was to create a community asset, not simply an outdoor cafeteria. The area has proven successful, packed at lunchtime with workers from all three projects on the block, as well as visitors from nearby buildings.
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34.05865 -118.414764
20th Street Offices 1507 20th Street Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
2 20th Street Offices
Must See LA Landmarks
The 20th Street Offices serve as creative working studios for three design firms in Santa Monica, California. They consist of approximately 6,800 sf of studio space in a two story, plus mezzanine, building. They are located on a 7,500 square foot lot in one of the United States top ‘green’ cities. Santa Monica earned this ranking with its extensive Green Building Program and public policies. However, the prominence of sustainable initiatives in Santa Monica doesn’t end with policy; an extensive network of environmentally conscious citizens and business owners, of which the architects of the 20th Street Offices are a member, propels it forward. It is the firm’s desire, along side of its latest trajectories in architectural design and theory, to responsibly lead its fellow citizens, colleagues, and clients in green building initiatives and made no exception when designing their own offices as they pursued a LEED-NC Gold rating. 
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34.027802 -118.477807
255 S Hill Street Los Angeles, CA United States
3 315 So Bunker Hill Avenue
Must See LA Landmarks
This is one of a collection of Kay Martin's paintings owned by the CRA.
Courtesy of CRA/LA.
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34.052393 -118.249111
1351 3rd Street Promenade #201, Santa Monica, CA 90401
4 3rd Street Promenade
Must See LA Landmarks
The Third Street Promenade is an upscale shopping, dining and entertainment complex in the downtown area of Santa Monica, California. It is considered a premier shopping and dining district on the Westside and draws crowds from all over the Greater Los Angeles Area.
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34.016509 -118.49611
6518 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood, CA 90028 United States
5 Armoured Corset
Must See LA Landmarks

This study proposes the use of a nickel-magnesium thermobimetal as a smart material in the development of a responsive building skin. Thermobimetals are a lamination of two thin sheet metals with different expansion coefficients, which when heated results in the curling of the material. His research considers the application of thermobimetals in architecture by multiplying the capacity of its character into a two-dimensional surface, a skin for a building. The intent is to develop a skin that as the outside (or inside) temperature rises, each individual metal tile will curve and the pores of the skin will physically open, allowing the building to ventilate automatically. To investigate the capacity of this material in this application, various tile shapes and forms were tested and modeled digitally in Catia and ParaCloud. The final selected tile was a simple, but digitally pliable, cross-shape. The dynamic shape of the overall structure allowed each tile to change parametrically, where no two tiles are identical. Depending on the length of the arms of the cross, the tiles will curve horizontally or vertically. The overall form will shrink when heated and will offset the fine-tuned balance of the structure, rocking it to maximize its shade. This piece was up in 2010 and since then has been taken down. There are plans to reinstall it in the Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX.

http://www.dosu-arch.com/armoured.html
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34.101749 -118.331659
8826 Burton way Beverly Hills, CA 90211 United States
6 Bay Cities
Must See LA Landmarks
The building at the corner of Burton Way and Clark in the city of Beverly Hills was existing. It was a box sitting there for fifty years with its brick wall, wood truss roof structure and steel framed windows and had to be transformed into a showroom for kitchens and appliances. 


The intention for the design of this building was to go beyond the architectural implication of the site and remove the corner completely, both conceptually and literary and treat it as if the surfaces of the two sides of the building corner are unfolded into a flat surface. The entire front portion of the building on Burton Way and Clark was removed and was replaced with ten feet deep façade constructed with planes of steel and glass which start to incline away and to the corner and to the either side of the property. The orientation effect of the planes creates a different field of vision which is experienced from every direction inside and out of the building. The Existing and the new juxtaposed independently joint with a skylight which runs across the entire front portion of the building.
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34.072195 -118.384531
8520 National Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232 United States
7 Beehive
Must See LA Landmarks

The Beehive is a part of Conjuctive Points, a development that Moss has been working on with the owner of the Hayden Tract for some time. For this building, an existing two-story, wood building was removed and a new two-story structure was designed over the same footprint, leaving only the street façade as a place for the architect to creatively explore with materials. The project is an exercise in creating a public image for the building that is capable of communicating its presence in a limited area along a busy street.

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34.026824 -118.379445
455 North Rexford Drive Beverly, CA 90210 United States
8 Beverly Hills Civic Center
Must See LA Landmarks
Dedicated in 1990, the Beverly Hills Civic Center playfully and dramatically expands on City Hall's Spanish Renaissance architecture. Curved colonnades frame the approaches to the renovated and expanded City Hall, library and police and fire departments, creating a public space that is both mysterious and welcoming.


Lush gardens of palm trees, numerous balconies and stairways create a unique sense of place. The colorful tile flourishes echo City Hall's tiled dome. A series of elliptical courtyards connect the city's buildings across Rexford Drive ""like beads on a string"" as the architect described it.


The $110 million renovation project began in 1982 with a contest. Six prominent architects (including Frank Gehry Disney Hall) submitted designs. The winner, chosen in a blind selection process, was Charles Willard Moore of Urban Innovations Group.


Charles Moore (1925-1993) was born in Benton Harbor, Michigan. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1947 with a degree in architecture and received a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1957. He taught architecture for most of his career at various universities including Yale, UC Berkeley and UCLA. His approach to architecture was humanistic and attempted to create what he called ""a place that is distinguishable in mind and memory from other places."" Other notable Moore buildings include Sea Ranch Condominiums in Sonoma County, Kresge College at UC Santa Cruz and Burns House in Santa Monica Canyon. 
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34.073475 -118.400259
340 Main Street Venice, CA 90291 United States
9 Binoculars Building
Must See LA Landmarks
The Binoculars Building, originally the Chiat/Day Building, is a commercial office building located in the Venice neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Built between 1985-1991 for advertising agency Chiat/Day (now TBWA\Chiat\Day) as its West Coast corporate headquarters, it was designed by Los Angeles architect Frank Gehry, his last project in Los Angeles until the Walt Disney Concert Hall began construction in 1999.
Wikipedia
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33.99591 -118.477013
1740 Stanford St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
10 Blair Graphics
Must See LA Landmarks
This project for a prominent Los Angeles reprographics company provides renovation and expansion of an existing facility of 18,131 square feet. An outdated black and white photo lab was replaced with a new electronic digital color photo lab. The new lobby features industrial skylights, exposed wood structure, and new finishes. Animproved front façade was greatly enhanced for customer experience and public perception.


Dominant materials used for the project include: galvanized metal at the entry canopy, digital customer lounge, and public corridor; cast aluminum signage at the front facade; and clear glass in douglas fir wood frames at the lobby and digital customer lounge. The existing multi-colored exterior facade was visually simplified by the addition of red brick walls to match the aesthetic of the original brick warehouse. This neutral facade acts as a backdrop for the dramatic folded metal entry canopy and glass lobby. Artificial and natural lighting of the canopy surfaces enhances this architectural feature establishing it as a company icon for both day and night. 


Randall Stout Architects
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34.031874 -118.46504
Los Angeles, CA 90037 United States
11 California Science Center
Must See LA Landmarks
The California Science Center (sometimes spelled California ScienCenter) is a state agency and museum located in Exposition Park, Los Angeles. Billed as the West Coast's largest hands-on science center, the California Science Center is a public-private partnership between the State and the California Science Center Foundation.
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34.003649 -118.281813
100 S Main St Los Angeles, 90012 United States
12 Caltrans District 7 Headquarters
Must See LA Landmarks
While its material language and structural elements allude to freeway infrastructure, the kinetic architecture of the building facade borrows its characteristic animation directly from the car. The outer layer of the double facade delaminates from the body of the building-functioning like the car body to protect and shield its inhabitants via a constantly shifting mechanical skin of perforated aluminum panels that alternately open or close depending on the sun’s angle and intensity. Appearing to be windowless and opaque at midday, the building transforms in appearance over time until it reaches near complete transparency at dusk-the fundamental reading of the building is in terms of transformation. 
http://morphopedia.com
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34.052197 -118.243554
1750 Vine St Los Angeles, CA 90028 United States
13 Capitol Records
Must See LA Landmarks
The Capitol Records Building is one of the most iconic buildings in Los Angeles. It was built in 1956, and designed by Louis Naidorf of the firm Welton Becket & Associates. The building resembles a stack of records, although Naidorf denies that records were the inspiration for the look of the building. The spire on top of the building blinks "Hollywood" in morse code at night.
Lindsey Miller
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34.103561 -118.326488
Chinatown - Los Angeles, CA
14 Chinatown - Los Angeles, CA
Must See LA Landmarks
The first Chinese was recorded to be in Los Angeles in 1852. Continuous settlement began in 1857. By 1870, an identifiable "Chinatown" of 200 or so was situated on Calle de Los Negros - Street of the Dark Hued Ones - a short alley 50 feet wide and one block long between El Pueblo Plaza and Old Arcadia Street. These early, mostly male, Chinese were mainly laundrymen, market gardeners, agricultural and ranch workers, and road builders. Despite the heavy discrimination in the late 19th century, Chinese held a dominant economic position in the Los Angeles laundry and produce industries for several years of this period. Consequently, old Chinatown flourished, expanding eastward from the Plaza across Alameda Street and eventually attaining a population of over 3000.
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34.064709 -118.23996
6925 Hollywood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90028 United States
15 Chinese Mann Theatre
Must See LA Landmarks
Mann's Chinese Theatre (formerly Grauman's Chinese Theatre, now TCL Chinese Theatre) is a movie theater on the historic Hollywood Walk of Fame.
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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34.101997 -118.340886
1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90049
16 Getty Center
Must See LA Landmarks
A campus for the J. Paul Getty Trust founded by oilman J. Paul Getty. The $1.3 billion center, which opened on December 16, 1997,[2] is also well known for its architecture, gardens, and views overlooking Los Angeles. The center sits atop a hill connected to a visitors' parking garage at the bottom of the hill by a three-car, cable-pulled tram. Designed by architect Richard Meier, the campus includes a central garden designed by artist Robert Irwin.
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34.088475 -118.476407
6925 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, CA 90028
17 Grauman's Chinese Theatre
Must See LA Landmarks
After his success with the Egyptian Theatre, Sid Grauman turned to Charles E. Toberman to secure a long term lease on property at 6925 Hollywood Blvd. Toberman contracted the architectural firm of Meyer & Holler (who had also designed the Egyptian) to design a "palace type theatre" of Chinese design.
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34.101556 -118.340724
East Observatory Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 900272800
18 Griffith Park
Must See LA Landmarks
Griffith Park is a large municipal park at the eastern end of the Santa Monica Mountains in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. The park covers 4,310 acres (1,740�ha) of land, making it one of the largest urban parks in North America.
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34.121132 -118.29982
2301 N Highland Ave Los Angeles, CA 90068 United States
19 Hollywood Bowl
Must See LA Landmarks
The Hollywood Bowl is a modern amphitheater in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles, California, United States that is used primarily for music performances. It is the largest natural amphitheater in the United States, with a seating capacity of nearly 18,000.
Wikipedia
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34.113528 -118.339705
Los Angeles , CA United States
20 Hollywood Sign
Must See LA Landmarks
The sign was first erected in 1923 and originally read "HOLLYWOODLAND". Its purpose was to advertise the name of a new housing development in the hills above the Hollywood district of Chinatown. H.J. Whitley had already used a sign to advertise his development Whitley Heights, which was located between Highland Avenue and Vine Avenue. He suggested to his friend Harry Chandler, the owner of the Los Angeles Times newspaper, that the land syndicate in which he was involved make a similar sign to advertise their land. Real estate developers Woodruff and Shoults called their development "Hollywoodland" and advertised it as a "superb environment without excessive cost on the Hollywood side of the hills". 
wikipedia
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34.100434 -118.234863
7018 Hollywood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90028
21 Hollywood Walk of Fame
Must See LA Landmarks
Consists of more than 2,400 five-pointed terrazzo and brass stars embedded in the sidewalks along fifteen blocks of Hollywood Boulevard and three blocks of Vine Street in Hollywood, California. The Walk of Fame is administered by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce and maintained by the self-financing Hollywood Historic Trust.
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34.101528 -118.342394
6801 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood, CA 90028 United States
22 Kodak Theatre (Dolby Theatre)
Must See LA Landmarks
The Dolby Theatre is the first permanent home for the Academy Awards ceremonies (the Oscars). It has hosted these annual awards ceremonies since its opening on November 9, 2001.
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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34.103046 -118.340156
800 W Olympic Blvd, Los Angeles, California 90015
23 L.A. Live
Must See LA Landmarks
An entertainment complex in Downtown Los Angeles, California adjacent to the Staples Center. L.A. Live cost approximately $2.5 billion USD and was developed by Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG), Wachovia Corp, Azteca Corp and investment firm MacFarlane Partners with help from Los Angeles taxpayers. It has 5,600,000 square feet of apartments, ballrooms, bars, concert theatres, restaurants, movie theaters and a 54-story hotel and condominium tower, on a 27-acre site. The complex became home to AEG and Herbalife headquarters in December 2008.
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34.044994 -118.264082
5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036
24 Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Must See LA Landmarks
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art was established as a museum in 1961. LACMA is the largest encyclopedic museum west of Chicago and attracts nearly one million visitors annually. The museum was built in a style similar to Lincoln Center and the Los Angeles Music Center and consisted of three buildings: the Ahmanson Building, the Bing Center, and the Lytton Gallery (renamed the Frances and Armand Hammer Building in 1968). In 2004, LACMA's Board of Trustees unanimously approved plans to transform the museum, led by world-renowned architect Renzo Piano.
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34.06261 -118.35801
Melrose Ave
25 Melrose Avenue
Must See LA Landmarks
An internationally renowned shopping, dining and entertainment destination in Los Angeles. The eastern end of the district, which runs from Fairfax to Highland Avenue, became a popular underground and new wave shopping area in the early 1980s. Pioneered by adventurous independent retailers and restaurateurs, Melrose Avenue captured the global imagination as the birthplace of Southern California's New Wave and Punk cultures. Rapid notoriety quickly lured movie stars, moguls, and style seekers, leading the press to dub Melrose Avenue "the new Rodeo Drive." The Western End, popularly referred to as Melrose Heights, runs from La Cienega Blvd. to Fairfax Avenue and features a variety of upscale restaurants and boutiques.
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34.081593 -118.382557
8687 Melrose Avenue West Hollywood, CA 90069
26 Pacific Design Center
Must See LA Landmarks
The PDC houses the West Coast's top decorating and furniture market, with showrooms, public and private spaces, a branch of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) and two restaurants operated by chef and restauranteur Wolfgang Puck. Designed by architect Cesar Pelli, the 14-acre (57,000 m2) campus opened in 1975, with the 750,000-square-foot (70,000 m2) Center Blue. Center Green opened in 1988, adding 450,000 square feet (42,000 m2). A long planned third phase, Center Red, was announced in April 2006, with plans for completion in 2011. Center Red has evolved into a 400,000-square-foot (37,000 m2) structure with two state-of-the-art office towers�six and eight stories high respectively�sitting atop seven levels of enclosed parking for 1,500 cars
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34.081593 -118.382557
13141 Fountain Park Drive Playa Vista, CA 90094 United States
27 Playa Vista Park
Downtown Landmarks
The 8-acre Playa Vista Park creates an infrastructure of active recreation and performance spaces that support unscripted activity and an open experience of public space in our city. Located at the eastern terminus of one of the largest infill urban developments in the United States, the Park creates a flexible network of interconnection, a campus that links and expands the surrounding context of offices to include the Park as a whole. 
Defined as a series of bands which extend across its length, the Park physically and programmatically links offices to the north and south. Each of these bridges literally span between a series of ponds and figuratively connect the surrounding context through the long bosques of alders, elms, and pines which trace their outline. These tree-lined rooms, defined through their programmatic use and spatial characteristics, concatenate to form a bar code of experiences through which visitors can traverse enfilade, short-cut across a single bridge, or navigate at random. 
The Park is not a mimetic representation of nature, but is instead defined by its activity, its utility, and its performance. Rather than creating a series of static scenes in relationship to a fixed, linear narrative, the Park encourages a multiplicity of simultaneous itineraries, experiences, and encounters through its function and form. Individual program areas, including the soccer fields and basketball courts to the west and amphitheater lawn and a large open bosque for gathering and relaxation to the east extend to the street edge, a drop-down menu of activities drawing visitors directly within.
Along its central axis, a single path connects entry plazas at the Park’s east and west edges, uniting it in a single perspective. Echoing the historic Howard Hughes runway which once crossed the site, this trajectory is further defined by elongated stripes of color and light designed with artist Daniel Buren, visible not only within the Park but also to aircraft landing at the nearby Los Angeles International Airport. Long allées of Jacarandas crisscross the Park from west to east, blooming in the spring and early summer to create strong bands of color linking the park as a whole. In this way, the Park is akin to a campus, its tightly integrated network of pathways and programs simultaneously open, unscripted, and democratic in how they are accessed and used.
Beyond the courts, a large amphitheater slopes to the north, shaping sight lines to a Bandshell at the Park’s center. Rising above the park, the Bandshell’s circular iconography is defined by a series of three rings which arc above the pedestrian paths at its base, extending trajectories of movement from the adjacent landscape into its dynamic form. These three steel hoops structure the shell’s envelope, a pleated membrane which floats lightly above the landscape, its glowing form visible throughout the Park and beyond as day gives way to night. The Bandshell incorporates a flexible lighting grid and an expansive stage which can support a wide range of performance, including theatrical productions as well as outdoor movies and events. 
Michael Maltzan Architecture
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33.97504 -118.428905
S. Pine Avenue & E. Shoreline Long Beach, CA 90802 United States
28 Queensway Bay
Must See LA Landmarks
By creating a new downtown harbor with a revitalized shoreline park and new commercial development, Queensway Bay is a significant element in reestablishing Long Beach as the most important waterfront destination in the region. Key to the development’s success was creating a truly Southern California waterfront. The new harbor, with a two-level palm lined boardwalk esplanade, is set within a lush landscape of tropical and semi-tropical plants. A new aquarium and outdoor exhibits complement the commercial development and attract residents as well as visitors. Transportation and access played a vital role, with bikeways, pedestrian paths, parking structures and water taxis playing an integral part in the final design. OLIN developed site-specific railings, paving, site furnishings and lighting features custom for Queensway Bay. 
OLIN
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33.76321 -118.192699
Rodeo Dr Los Angeles, CA
29 Rodeo Drive
Must See LA Landmarks
Rodeo Drive of Beverly Hills, California is a shopping district known for designer label and haute couture fashion. The name generally refers to a three-block long stretch of boutiques and shops but the street stretches further north and south.
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34.057566 -118.400388
321 Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica, CA 90401 United States
30 Santa Monica Pier
Must See LA Landmarks
The Santa Monica Pier is a large double-jointed pier located at the foot of Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica, California and is a prominent, 100-year-old landmark.
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34.009768 -118.49757
601 Santa Monica Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90401 United States
31 Santa Monica Public Library
Must See LA Landmarks
This new main Library reflects the character of Santa Monica as a place and as a community, supporting a well-informed public in the comfort of the benign coastal climate of southern California. Seeking to enhance community awareness and encourage public use, the design presents a building of approachable scale and civic proportions, opening in all directions to access, daylight, and views into and out of the building.
Designed through a series of community meetings, the 110,000 square foot library responds to Santa Monica’s breezy-but-enlightened culture by incorporating large, sun-shaded windows, colorful pocket gardens, and a broad spectrum of sustainability features—ultimately winning the project LEED™ Gold certification. One of the many sustainability measures is the use of an inverted “impluvium” roof and underground cistern to collect rainwater for landscape maintenance.
At the center of the whole is a large enclosed garden court containing a small café with wireless connectivity. The north court and central garden/café combine with a 200-seat auditorium and multi-purpose rooms to offer a dynamic venue for public use. In addition, a small museum and flexible spaces can alternately accommodate exhibitions and informal presentations. The building serves as an urban oasis at the center of fast-paced residential and commercial redevelopment, earning its title as the “Living Room of the City.”
Moore Ruble Yudell Architects & Planners
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34.018661 -118.493364
426 S Spring St, Los Angeles, CA
32 Spring Street Park
Must See LA Landmarks
The Spring Street Park is a collaboration between the Architectural Division of the City of Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering and Lehrer Architects LA. As residential density has increased in this burgeoning area of Downtown Los Angeles, the need for additional infrastructure has become evident, and this new urban park will provide much needed outdoor public space to the neighborhood.
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34.04889 -118.248725
Sunset Strip CA
33 Sunset Strip
Must See LA Landmarks

Sunset Strip is the name given to the mile-and-a-half (2.4 km) stretch of Sunset Boulevard that passes through West Hollywood, California embracing a premier collection of boutiques, restaurants, rock clubs, and nightclubs that are on the cutting edge of the entertainment industry. It is also known for its trademark array of huge, colorful billboards and has developed a notoriety as a hangout for rock stars, movie stars and other entertainers.

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34.092402 -118.381634
189 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90036
34 The Grove LA
Must See LA Landmarks
A retail and entertainment complex in Los Angeles, California, built, owned, and operated by Rick J. Caruso and his company Caruso Affiliated on parts of the historical Farmers Market. The 575,000-square-foot outdoor marketplace is located in Los Angeles' Fairfax District. Caruso Affiliated claims to have modeled its architectural designs on indigenous Los Angeles buildings, influenced by classic historic districts, with shopping alleys, broad plazas, and intimate courtyards. The design features a series of Art Deco-style false fronts, with boxy interiors similar to those found in other contemporary stores.
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34.072793 -118.356317
101 N. Manchester Inglewood, CA 90301 United States
35 The Written Word
Must See LA Landmarks
Tom Van Sant is known for sculpted concrete murals and conceptual form. His professional skills and intellectual interests range across architectural design, city planning, art education and advanced technical invention.
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33.962245 -118.356056
13280 Chapman Avenue Garden Grove, CA 92840 United States
36 Tower of Hope
Must See LA Landmarks
Initiated in 1995 and completed in Spring 2000, Project 9865-Tower of Hope is the achievement
of thousands of children battling cancer, spinal injuries, burn trauma, AIDS, heart ailments
and other conditions in hospitals, pediatric care centers, and illness-related camps throughout
CA, who were assisted by many communities which joined together to help them realize
the public art creation. Painting a new canvas for the 165 ft. high tower - panel by panel -
provided youngsters coping with pain, isolation and fear with a joyous and therapeutic outlet
in the course of undergoing their treatments. Students in more than 100 schools and youth
programs participated in civic leadership sessions during which they helped prepare the
panels for the hospital sessions and created thousands of Portraits of Hope get well cards for
the kids with messages in English, Spanish, Japanese, Korean, Farsi, Hebrew and Braille.
www.portraitsofhope.org
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33.789188 -117.899458
11933 W Washington Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90066
37 Venice Beach
Must See LA Landmarks
A sandy three-mile beach with street entertainment at every intersection along Ocean Front Walk during summer and weekends. Street performers include instrumental musicians, singers, jugglers, acrobats, mimes, comics, magicians, prophets, fortune tellers, and other assorted entertainers.
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33.998579 -118.420944
3600 Riverside Drive Los Angeles, CA 90027 United States
38 William Mulholland Memorial Fountain
Downtown Landmarks
Dedicated in 1940, Mulholland Memorial is a city landmark that commemorates William Mulholland, LADWP’s first water superintendent and chief engineer responsible for the construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. The Los Angeles Aqueduct is an engineering marvel that, since 1913, has brought water from the Owens Valley to Los Angeles on gravity alone.
The work consists of a memrial fountain, portrait plaque, three works of signage and several dedicated trees and rocks.
The work was restored in 1998 and again in 2012 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Los Angeles Aquaduct. 
adwp.com
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34.117525 -118.271728