map MapLA
Downtown Landmarks
135 N. Grand Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90012 United States
1 Ahmanson Founders Room
Downtown Landmarks
The Ahmanson Founders Room is a 2,500 ft2 addition buried in the first level of subterranean parking at The Music Center in downtown Los Angeles. The sunken location of the room coupled with an almost clandestine preoccupation of exclusivity by the founders helped orient the design objectives. Belzberg Architects pursued the development of sensual lighting schemes and unique applications of material and texture to create a warm place of respite between the congested streets of L.A. and the brimming communal areas of The Music Center on event night.


The materials used for the ceiling and walls were actually low-grade douglas fir lumber and medium density fiberboard. However, sculpting the ceiling panels and perforating the wall panels with supple patterns and textures transformed low-grade into classy with stunning visual effects and a colorful saturation of the space. The character and unique components of this room have become an entity for which the Ahmanson Theatre founders can identify with and claim as their own.
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34.058348 -118.247974
3502 Watt Way Los Angeles, CA 90007 United States
2 Annenberg School of Communication & Journalism
Downtown Landmarks
The Annenberg School of Communication & Journalism is located on the USC campus, and was designed in 1976 by iconic Los Angeles architect A. Quincy Jones (1913-1979). The building is defined by its exposed, pre-fabricated concrete ""waffle slab"" floor system. The building also features an energy-saving "air flow" system of heating and cooling first developed by Jones.
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34.022396 -118.286619
304 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA United States
3 Bradbury Building
Downtown landmarks
Built for mining tycoon Lewis Bradbury, the 1893 building is a National Register Landmark, and one of the most significant existing structures in Los Angeles’ architectural heritage.


Designed by George Wyman, this Chicago-style sandstone and terra cotta-clad building is noted for its atrium skylight, which spans the entire five stories, and open-cage elevators. Likely the most photographed structure in the city, it has been the location of many movies, including Bladerunner, Ridley Scott’s cult science-fiction film.


Over the years, the building fell into disrepair, the skylight became encrusted with dirt, the light-oak ceilings and marble floor took on a dark patina, and the distinctive wrought-iron handrails and elevator cabs were in need of restoration. Developer Ira Yellin, an urbanist and owner of the adjacent Grand Central Market, also renovated by the firm, purchased the building in 1989. He committed to restoring and reopening the building in time for its centennial anniversary.


Exterior, street-level improvements have included the redefinition of a storage area into a rear entrance portico which connects the atrium lobby to an adjacent urban park and parking structure. Ground-floor retail storefronts have been redesigned to accommodate a variety of tenants, while remaining compatible with the historic facade. This has included the reconstruction of the cornice and portals to match the deteriorated original sandstone, and the creation of a color-integral storefront composed of stucco, black aluminum and glass with glazed, back-lit signage panels.


When completed, the renewed and cherished Bradbury Building, located at a strategic intersection on Los Angeles’ Broadway, symbolized hope for regeneration of the city’s vital urban core.
Levin & Associates


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34.051166 -118.247974
835 West 34th St. Los Angeles, CA 90007 United States
4 Campus Religious Center, University of Southern California
Downtown Landmarks
The firm Killingsworth, Brady & Associates designed the University Religious Center in 1966 on the USC campus. Edward Killingsworth was a USC alum and is one of the most iconic mid-century modern architects in Los Angeles. The building is a prime example of the simple, post-and-beam construction system that is evident in the firm's projects.

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34.023747 -118.28531
555 West Temple St Los Angeles, CA 90012 United States
5 Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels
Downtown Landmarks
Founded in 1781 by 44 Hispanic people from the San Gabriel Mission area, the City of Los Angeles began its history with a distinctive diversity of peoples, of cultures, and of languages. Although various sections of Los Angeles became populated with dominant ethnic groups, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Mexican, Armenian, African American, Filipino, and Polish, among others, the Church chose to keep virtually all of the parish communities territorial, rather than designated by ethnicity.


The challenge in designing and building a new Cathedral Church was to make certain that it reflected the diversity of all people. Rather than duplicate traditional designs of the Middle Ages in Europe, the Cathedral is a new and vibrant expression of the 21st century Catholic peoples of Los Angeles.


Just as many European Cathedrals are built near rivers, Moneo considered the Hollywood Freeway as Los Angeles' river of transportation, the connection of people to each other. The site is located between the Civic Center and the Cultural Center of the city.


"I wanted both a public space," said Moneo, "and something else, what it is that people seek when they go to church."" To the architect, the logic of these two competing interests suggested, first of all, a series of "buffering, intermediating spaces"" -- plazas, staircases, colonnades, and an unorthodox entry.


Worshippers enter on the south side, rather than the center, of the Cathedral through a monumental set of bronze doors cast by sculptor Robert Graham. The doors are crowned by a completely contemporary statue of Our Lady of the Angels.


A 50 foot concrete cross ""lantern"" adorns the front of the Cathedral. At night its glass- protected alabaster windows are illuminated and can be seen at a far distance.


The 151 million pound Cathedral rests on 198 base isolators so that it will float up to 27 inches during a magnitude 8 point earthquake. The design is so geometrically complex that none of the concrete forms could vary by more than 1/16th of an inch.


The Cathedral is built with architectural concrete in a color reminiscent of the sun-baked adobe walls of the California Missions and is designed to last 500 years. 
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34.058206 -118.245013
630 W 5th St, Los Angeles, CA 90071-2002
6 Central Library: Los Angeles Public Library
Downtown Landmarks
With more than six million volumes, it is one of the largest publicly funded library systems in the world. Architect Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue designed the original Los Angeles Central Library with influences of ancient Egyptian and Mediterranean Revival architecture. The central tower is topped with a tiled mosaic pyramid with suns on the sides with a hand holding a torch representing the "Light of Learning" at the apex. Other elements include sphinxes, snakes, and celestial mosaics. It has sculptural elements by the preeminent American architectural sculptor Lee Lawrie, similar to the Nebraska State Capitol in Lincoln, Nebraska, also designed by Goodhue. The building is a designated Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, and is on the National Register of Historic Places.
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34.050422 -118.254289
Los Angeles, CA
7 Chinatown
Downtown Landmarks
The first Chinese was recorded to be in Los Angeles in 1852. Continuous settlement began in 1857. By 1870, an identifiable "Chinatown" of 200 or so was situated on Calle de Los Negros - Street of the Dark Hued Ones - a short alley 50 feet wide and one block long between El Pueblo Plaza and Old Arcadia Street. These early, mostly male, Chinese were mainly laundrymen, market gardeners, agricultural and ranch workers, and road builders. Despite the heavy discrimination in the late 19th century, Chinese held a dominant economic position in the Los Angeles laundry and produce industries for several years of this period. Consequently, old Chinatown flourished, expanding eastward from the Plaza across Alameda Street and eventually attaining a population of over 3000.
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34.05349 -118.245319
1334 South Central Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90021
8 Coca-Cola Building
Downtown Landmarks
A Coca-Cola bottling plant remodeled as a Streamline Modern building designed by architect Robert V. Derrah with the appearance of a ship with portholes, catwalk and a bridge from five existing industrial buildings in 1939. It is located at 1334 South Central Avenue in Los Angeles, California.
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34.028992 -118.246332
849 Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90014 United States
9 Eastern Columbia Building
Downtown Landmarks
Considered by many to be the most beautiful of Los Angeles' historic buildings, as well as its finest surviving example of Art Deco architecture, The Eastern Columbia Building is a thirteen-story building located in the Broadway Theater District of downtown Los Angeles. It originally housed two retail stores: Columbia and Eastern outfitting, and this is where its name comes from.
Gebhard. David and Robbert Winter, An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles/ Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Considered by many to be the most beautiful of Los Angeles' historic buildings, as well as its finest surviving example of Art Deco architecture, The Eastern Columbia Building is a thirteen-story building located in the Broadway Theater District of downtown Los Angeles.
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34.043183 -118.256128
Los Angeles, CA 90089 United States
10 Edward L. Doheny, Jr. Memorial Library (Doheny Library)
Downtown Landmarks
The Edward L. Doheny, Jr. Memorial Library is a library located in the center of campus at the USC.It has served as an intellectual center and cultural treasure for generations of students, faculty and staff since it opened in 1932.

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34.022822 -118.289151
125 Paseo De La Plz # 400, Los Angeles, CA 90012
11 El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument
Downtown Landmarks
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument is near the site of the early Los Angeles pueblo or town where forty-four settlers of Native American, African and European heritage journeyed more than one-thousand miles across the desert from present-day northern Mexico and established a farming community in September 1781. Since that time, Los Angeles has been under the flags of Spain, Mexico and the United States and has grown into one of the world�s largest metropolitan areas. Today, as a department of the City of Los Angeles, El Pueblo is a living museum that continues to fulfill its unique role as the historic and symbolic heart of the city, reflecting the Native American, African American, Spanish, Anglo, Mexican, Chinese, Italian and French cultures that contributed to its early history. Of the monument�s twenty-seven historic buildings, eleven are open to the public as businesses or have been restored as museums.
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34.056406 -118.239249
701 State Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90037
12 Exposition Park Rose Garden
Downtown Landmarks
The Rose Garden, originally called the Sunken Garden, was designated as one of the first features when Exposition Park was converted from a former agricultural park and race track in 1913. The LA Department of Recreation and Parks planted 15,000 bushes with over 100 varieties (1) of roses and other flowers for the Rose Garden's opening in 1928. That has since grown to over 200,000 bushes and over 200 varieties.
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34.016989 -118.286555
685 South Figueroa Street Los Angeles, CA United States
13 Fine Arts Building
Downtown Landmarks
The Fine Arts Building (also known as Global Marine House) was built in the Romanesque Revival style in 1925. In 1974, it was designated as a Historic Cultural Monument by the Cultural Heritage Commission.
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34.050259 -118.259711
633 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90071
14 First Interstate World Center: U.S. Bank
Downtown Landmarks
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34.050449 -118.25429
317 Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90013 United States
15 Grand Central Square
Downtown Landmarks
Grand Central Square is a phased development completed by Levin in 1995 for developer Ira Yellin. The project included rehabilitation and renovation of the 1917 landmark market, conversion of the six-story Homer Laughlin and 12-story Million Dollar buildings into housing, the two-story Lyon Building into offices, and construction of a new, 11-tier parking structure. The 611,000 square-foot transformation was intended as the staging ground for the revived downtown residential and shopping district.
Located within the downtown historic core, the parking structure is designed to complement the historic features and proportions of the adjacent buildings. Organized classically with a base, middle and cap, the canopies, lighting elements, and sculptural steel connections reference these regulating lines. Steel-plate bison heads, inspired by the 1917 Million Dollar building’s terra cotta version, support the glass canopies.
For generations, the John Parkinson-designed Grand Central Market has been the focus of downtown’s communal life. Successive waves of Angelenos of various ethnicities have mingled in its cavernous space, rubbing shoulders, buying everyday and exotic foods. In a sprawling, car-defining metropolis, the market is one of the few places where this interaction occurs so vividly.
Peeling off layers of earlier modernizations, the architects have updated and enlivened the market’s 58 separate stalls. The columns and their modified classic capitals have been painted black to establish an orderly internal rhythm, augmented by the placement of light fixtures and fly-fans. Skylights which had been blackened out since World War II were reopened and covered with louvers to diffuse the light and protect the produce. Vintage neon signs marking each stall have been restored, and new ones were created. New steel and glass rollup doors have been added to each entry to the market, maintaining through-block access.
The market’s connection between Broadway, a major Latino shopping venue, and the upscale Bunker Hill district to the west, has been clarified as one of downtown’s most energetic social and physical linkages.
Levin & Associates
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34.050597 -118.248897
Los Angeles, CA 90012
16 Grand Park
Downtown Landmarks
The Grand Park is a 12-acre park located in the civic center of Los Angeles, California. It is part of the larger Grand Avenue Project, with its first phase having opened in July 2012. The Grand Park is part of a joint venture by the city of Los Angeles and Los Angeles County. Park programming and entertainment, security and upkeep is maintained by the nearby Los Angeles Music Center.
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34.067023 -118.243618
Los Angeles, CA 90089 United States
17 Helen Topping Architecture & Fine Arts Library
Downtown Landmarks
The Architecture & Fine Arts Library (AFA) is located in a modernist setting designed by Graeme Morland, a faculty member at the School of Architecture, on the ground floor of Watt Hall. It houses more than 75,000 volumes of books and journals dedicated to the studies of art history, fine arts, and architecture, as well as a notable collection of rare titles and artists' books.
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34.022894 -118.288937
1111 S Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90015
18 Herald Examiner Building
Downtown Landmarks
The Herald-Examiner building was designed and built by Julia Morgan, California's first registered female architect. Opened for business in 1914, the ornate building was home to the sensationalist tabloid-style Herald Express and then the Herald Examiner after a merger with the Examiner in 1962. In 2002, Hearst announced a partnership with developers Urban Partners to redevelop the Herald-Examiner site. Prtizker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne of Morphosis was commissioned to design two proposed towers to be linked with the Herald Examiner building through pedestrian walkways and a plaza. As of 2008, the project has been put on hold.
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34.039335 -118.259248
369 East 1st Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012
19 Japanese American National Museum
Downtown Landmarks
The Japanese American National Museum is the largest museum in the United States dedicated to sharing the experience of Americans of Japanese ancestry. The mission of the Japanese American National Museum is to promote understanding and appreciation of America�s ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience.
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34.049347 -118.239404
1201 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, California 90015
20 LA Convention Center
Downtown Landmarks
A convention center in the southwest portion of downtown Los Angeles. The Convention Center, designed by architect Charles Luckman, opened in 1971 and expanded in 1993 by Gruen Associates. It was originally built as a rectangle building, between Pico Boulevard and 11th Street (now Chick Hearn Ct.) on Figueroa Street. The northeast portion of the Center was demolished in 1997 to make way for the Staples Center. The Convention Center Annex of green glass and white steel frames, mainly on the south side of Pico, was designed by architect James Ingo Freed.
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34.041825 -118.266938
200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012
21 Los Angeles City Hall
Downtown Landmarks
The building was designed by John Parkinson, John C. Austin, and Albert C. Martin, Sr., and was completed in 1928. Dedication ceremonies were held on April 26, 1928. It has 32 floors and, at 454 feet (138 m) high, is the tallest base-isolated structure in the world, having undergone a seismic retrofit from 1998 to 2001 so that the building will sustain minimal damage and remain functional after a magnitude 8.2 earthquake.[7] The concrete in its tower was made with sand from each of California's 58 counties and water from its 21 historical missions.[8] City Hall's distinctive tower was based on the purported shape of the Mausoleum of Mausolus,[citation needed] and shows the influence of the Los Angeles Public Library, completed soon before the structure was started. An image of City Hall has been on Los Angeles Police Department badges since 1940.[9]
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34.053847 -118.243585
111 N Hope St # 1221, Los Angeles, CA 90012
22 Los Angeles Department-Water & Power
Downtown Landmarks
On November 16, 2000, in honor of John Ferraro more than five decades of public service, the City of Los Angeles renamed the landmark Department of Water and Power's General Office Building to the John Ferraro Building. The building was designed by the architects AC Martin Partners, Inc. and opened in 1964.
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34.056584 -118.249701
506 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90071
23 Millennium Biltmore Hotel
Downtown Landmarks
A luxury hotel located on Pershing Square in Downtown Los Angeles, California. The architectural firm Schultze & Weaver designed the Biltmore's exterior in a synthesis of the Spanish-Italian Renaissance Revival, Mediterranean Revival, and Beaux Arts styles, meant as an homage to the Castilian heritage of Los Angeles. The "Biltmore Angel" is heavily incorporated into the design�as a symbol of the city as well as the Biltmore itself. With a thick steel and concrete frame, the structure takes up half a city block and rises over 11 stories.
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34.050027 -118.254047
135 North Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012
24 Music Center
Downtown Landmarks
Located in downtown Los Angeles, the Music Center is home to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Ahmanson Theater, Mark Taper Forum and Walt Disney Concert Hall. Each year, the Music Center welcomes more than 1.3 million people to performances by its four internationally renowned performing arts companies: Los Angeles Philharmonic, Center Theatre Group (CTG), L.A. Opera and Los Angeles Master Chorale.
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34.056127 -118.248441
125 Paseo De La Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90012
25 Olvera Street
Downtown Landmarks
Olvera Street is in the oldest part of Downtown Los Angeles, California, and is part of the El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument. Historically, it abutted the original Chinatown, which was later removed to its modern location to make way for Union Station. There are 27 buildings of various ages still standing on Olvera Street, including the Avila Adobe, the Pelanconi House, and the Sepulveda House. 
Wikipedia
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34.056979 -118.237996
801 Vignes Street Los Angeles, CA 90012 United States
26 Patsaouras Transit Plaza at Union Station
Downtown Landmarks
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the well-preserved architecture of Union Station is complemented by the timeless design and durability of Patsaouras Plaza. As a client to Catellus Development Corporation and Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority (METRO), OLIN completed a design for a part of the nation’s largest multi-modal transportation hub at Union Station in downtown Los Angeles. As the namesake to Nick Patsaouras, former Regional Transportation District board member and advocate for public transport, the plaza was created to enhance historic Union Station while encouraging widespread use of Los Angeles’s public transportation system. The exterior plaza uses patterned paving that extends through vehicular pathways, making it feel like a vibrant piazza rather than a stark terminal. Drop-offs and throughways for transit are integrated within the civic space, and the design features comfortable places for gathering and waiting, a sunken urban garden with fountains, pockets of native plantings, and interactive works of art. Integral to the curving walls, the sweeping arcs of bus shelters on the exterior drop-off create shade for passengers. 
OLIN
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34.056322 -118.231902
532 South Olive Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013
27 Pershing Square
Downtown Landmarks
In 1992, the park was closed for a major $14.5-million redesign and renovation by architect�landscape architect Ricardo Legorreta of Mexico, and landscape architect Laurie Olin of the U.S. The new park opened in 1994 with: a 10-story purple bell tower, fountains, numerous public artworks including a walkway representing an earthquake fault line designed and executed by artist Barbara McCarren, a concert stage, a seasonal ice rink, and small plazas with seating. It is now predominantly paved expanses, with small areas of trees in raised planters.[1]
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34.04896 -118.25331
665 West Jefferson Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007
28 Shrine Auditorium and Expo Hall
Downtown Landmarks
Opened in 1926, the current Shrine Auditorium replaced an earlier 1906 Al Malaikah Temple which had been destroyed by a fire on January 11, 1920. The new auditorium was designed in the Moorish Revival style by San Francisco-based theater architect G. Albert Lansburgh, with local architects John C. Austin and A. M. Edelman associated. In 2002, the Auditorium underwent a $15 million renovation that upgraded the auditorium's stage with state-of-the-art lighting and rigging systems, and included new roofing and air conditioning for both the Auditorium and Expo Center, modernized concession stands, additional restrooms, repainting of the Expo Center, and a new performance plaza and parking garage. The entire complex follows a Moroccan architectural motif.
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34.022615 -118.281358
555 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013
29 Southern California Gas Co
Downtown Landmarks
Gas Company Tower is a class-A office skyscraper in downtown Los Angeles, California. Located on the north side of Fifth Street between Olive Street and Grand Avenue, across from the Biltmore Hotel, the building serves as the headquarters for the Southern California Gas Company, which vacated its previous offices on Eighth- and Flower-streets in 1991, and is home to the Los Angeles offices of Arent Fox, Morrison & Foerster, and Sidley Austin.
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34.049984 -118.253584
304 South Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90013
30 The Bradbury Building
Downtown Landmarks
Built in 1893, the building was commissioned by LA mining millionaire Lewis L. Bradbury and designed by local draftsman George Wyman. The building features an Italian Renaissance Revival -style exterior facade of brown brick, sandstone and panels of terra cotta details, in the "commercial Romanesque Revival" that was the current idiom in East Coast American cities. But the magnificence of the building is the interior: reached through the entrance, with its low ceiling and minimal light, it opens into a bright naturally lit great center court.
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34.050648 -118.24827
250 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90012
31 The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Downtown Landmarks
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA) is a contemporary art museum with three locations in greater Los Angeles, California. The main branch is located on Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles, near Walt Disney Concert Hall. MOCA's original space, initially intended as a "temporary" exhibit space while the main facility was built, is now known as the Geffen Contemporary, in the Little Tokyo district of downtown Los Angeles. The Pacific Design Center facility is in West Hollywood.
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34.053714 -118.250515
411 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013
32 Title Guarantee Building
Downtown Landmarks
An Art Deco style highrise building on Pershing Square in Downtown Los Angeles that was built in 1930. The building was designed by The Parkinsons who also designed many Los Angeles landmarks, including Los Angeles City Hall and Bullocks Wilshire. Originally an office building, the structure was later converted into lofts.
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34.048901 -118.251987
800 N Alameda St, Los Angeles, CA 90012
33 Union Station
Downtown Landmarks
Union Station was partially designed by John Parkinson and Donald B. Parkinson (the Parkinsons) who had also designed Los Angeles City Hall and other landmark Los Angeles buildings. They were assisted by a group of supporting architects, including Jan van der Linden. The structure combines Dutch Colonial Revival architecture (the suggestion of the Dutch born Jan von der Linden), Mission Revival, and Streamline Moderne style, with architectural details such as eight-pointed stars.
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34.056188 -118.237491
699 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90089
34 University of Southern California - Park Campus
Downtown Landmarks
When the University of Southern California opened its doors to 53 students in 1880, Los Angeles still lacked paved streets and electric lights. Today, our city is a global center for the arts, technology and intercontinental trade, and USC is a world-renowned private research institution enrolling more international students than any other U.S. university and operating an integrated academic medical center that serves more than a million patients each year.
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34.018319 -118.28453
633 West Fifth Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013
35 US Bank Tower
Downtown Landmarks
It is the tallest building in California, the tenth-tallest in the United States. The building is also known as Library Tower because it was built as part of the $1 billion Los Angeles Central Library redevelopment area following two disastrous fires in 1986, and its location across the street.
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34.050449 -118.25429
100 N Toluca St, Los Angeles, CA
36 Vista Hermosa Natural Park
Downtown Landmarks
Vista Hermosa Natural Park is a 10.5 acre public community space which features a wide variety of amenities and recreational activity opportunities, including a soccer field, picnic grounds, playground, walking trails, outdoor amphitheater and more. For information on interpretive programs or public events, be sure to call the telephone number or visit the website provided.
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34.063894 -118.257952
111 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012
37 Walt Disney Concert Hall
Downtown Landmarks
The fourth hall of the Los Angeles Music Center, it is the home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic orchestra and the Los Angeles Master Chorale. Lillian Disney made an initial gift in 1987 to build a performance venue as a gift to the people of Los Angeles and a tribute to Walt Disney's devotion to the arts and to the city. The Frank Gehry-designed building opened on October 24, 2003. Both the architecture by Frank Gehry and the acoustics of the concert hall (designed by Yasuhisa Toyota) were praised in contrast to its predecessor, the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
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34.054986 -118.24936