The AIA|LA Advocacy Report
May 17, 2018
from the desk of
Will Wright - Director, Government & Public Affairs, AIA Los Angeles




LOCAL



RALLY TO SUPPORT TEMPORARY HOMELESS HOUSING


On Friday, May 18 8:45AM, please come rally your support for temporary homeless housing facilities. We will be meeting on the South Lawn of Los Angeles City Hall (1st and Spring St.). The rally is being organized by Council President Herb Wesson and will help bring together Angelenos passionate about solving our homelessness crisis.

Recently, the City Council and Mayor Eric Garcetti pledged to place temporary housing facilities on city-owned land to help provide shelter and support for our neighbors who are currently living on our streets. The temporary facilities will also be staffed with security and supportive services. In fact, each Councilmember pledged to find a location in all 15 council districts as an immediate response. Of course, as evidenced by some of the recent outcry emerging from neighbors in Koreatown, there is substantial push-back emerging.

However, with more architects and designers serving as community liaisons, we can listen to everyone’s concerns and identify effective pathways forward to bring about more immediate and more compassionate solutions.

Remember: it takes a village. And we are all in this together.


Designing an Inclusive Olympics in 2028


On May 9th, HANSON LA hosted a roundtable discussion that brought together a diverse group of stakeholders to discuss how we can establish a regional framework to advocate for achieving greater business and cultural inclusion as we prepare our region for the 2028 Olympics and Paralympics.

Speakers Included: 
  • Douglas Hanson, AIA, ASID - President, Hanson LA

My take-aways from the discussion:
 
1. Identify and connect with a collaborate and multi-disciplinary partners.
2. Place emphasis on connecting deeper with social justice groups and community-based organizations.
3. Utilize technological innovations to improve the procurement and project delivery process, so that it increases the opportunity for smaller firms to serve as prime contractors.
4. Expand the focus of ‘preparing for the Olympics’ to also involve improving the connective tissue of the city so that the improvements last well beyond the Olympics.
5. Establish goals and metrics to achieve a lower carbon footprint and strive for a Zero-Net Energy Olympics and beyond.
6. In the spirit of inclusion: when we refer to the Olympics, we should also expand the discussion to talk about the Paralympics and adaptive sports.
AIA Los Angeles welcomes the Olympics in 2028 and sees the event as a catalyst to promote the Los Angeles region as a world-class destination.  As we begin to strategically plan for the capital improvement projects that will ensure our city is prepared, we have a monumental opportunity to establish critical design-thinking protocols.  How do we ensure greater business inclusion and cultural diversity as it relates to procurement, project delivery and the professional service providers that will prepare our region to become a place for all nations to enjoy during the 2028 Olympics?  How do we accommodate for the changes that we will need make in order to cultivate a more beautiful, safer and more functional public realm without displacing existing communities?  How do we shape the legacy of the 2028 Olympics so that future generations of Angelenos will continue to feel the benefits for decades to come?


AFFORDABLE HOUSING LINKAGE FEE


Late last month, The Department of City Planning released an updated memo on the implementation phase-in of the AFLH. Beginning on June 18, 2018 one-third of the full fee amount will be due at the time of the building permit issuance. On December 20th, this will increase to two-thirds and the full amount of the fee will take effect on June 17, 2019. There are many exceptions to avoid paying the fee if you accommodate more affordability on-site in the building, encouraging more mixed-income housing production.

Between the density-bonus provisions of the Measure JJJ’s Transit-Oriented Communities (TOC) program and the incentives to provide for a mixture of more affordable units on site, the AHLF and the TOC will most likely begin to motivate the market towards delivering more mixed-income housing that will, ideally, help better stitch together our neighborhoods as more complete communities. To read the memo, click here.


MRCA RFP for Professional Services


The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) is inviting Requests for Proposals from professional, highly experienced environmental design firms to cooperatively assist MRCA, Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy (SMMC), and the SMMC's Assembly Bill (AB) 466 Working Group with the planning, coordination, development and preparation of an Upper Los Angeles River and Tributaries Revitalization Plan (Plan).  The entire Plan and process shall be completed within 15-18 months, with community engagement planned throughout the project. The effort is divided into three phases: Inventory and Analysis, Concept Development, and Plan Preparation, with estimated duration of approximately five months each.


Contact: Sarah Rascon, Sarah.rascon@mrca.ca.gov, (323) 221-9944 x. 109
570 West Avenue 26, Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA 90065
 


Direct all questions to the contact listed above before 3:00 PM on May 25, 2018. All interested firms must register with MRCA by 3:00 PM on June 1, 2018 in order to receive the clarifications and addenda. Clarifications will be distributed electronically by 3:00 PM on June 1, 2018 to all registered.  To register, send an email to the contact above. Follow the guidelines listed in the RFP and submit two unbound hard copies or a single electronic PDF file (preferred) by 3:00 PM on June 11, 2018 to the contact above. Late submissions will not be accepted.
 


FULL 12-PAGE RFP IS ONLINE AT http://www.mrca.ca.gov/projectlisting.html

Proposal submissions are due 3:00PM on June 11, 2018.



STATE



Are You Ready to Vote on June 5th?


Who are you voting for Governor? You have 27 to choose from? Or, what about our next Senator? We have 32 to choose from on Tuesday, June 5th.

We also have five new Propositions to vote yes or no on:

Prop 68 will authorize bonds to fund parks, natural resources protection, climate adaption, water quality and supply, and flood protections statewide.

Prop 69 safeguards the recent SB 1 revenue sources and requires that certain new transportation revenues be used for transportation purposes only.

Prop 70 amends the California constitution to requires legislative super-majority voter approval for the use of cap-and-trade reserve fund.

Prop 71 sets an effective date for ballot measures.

Prop 72 permits the legislature to exclude newly constructed rain-capture systems from property-tax reassessment.

I encourage you all to take a moment to read as much as you can about the above ballot measures and to vote on June 5th.

To read more about your options, check out CaliforiniaChoices.Org


ADVOCATE FOR MORE STATE FUNDING FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING


Recently, I received an email from David Howden – The Los Angeles Director of the Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH), encouraging more people to contact their state legislators ASAP to advocate for further shaping the State’s budget expenditure plan to more effectively address homelessness. For swift action, I am sharing that email’s CALL TO ACTION here (see below).

-Will Wright

Opportunities for State Investment in Homelessness

Instructions

1. Please add your logo to the fact sheet on investment in homelessness, entitled, “An Affordable Apartment is More Effective at Reducing Homelessness than a Shelter Bed.”
2. Please contact your legislators with the message that we support significant investment in addressing homelessness, along with a thoughtful plan on allocating that funding.
a. Go to the California Legislature website and search for the Assemblymember and Senator for both your home and work offices.
b. Either—
i. Call the legislators’ offices and ask to speak to the person who works on budget issues, using the talking points below. You can find contact information for all State legislators on the Legislature’s website.
ii. Send an e-mail to the legislator and the person working on budget issues for the legislator (using step i).
3. Additionally, send a letter, using sample below, to all legislators listed.

Talking Points
• I am calling from _________, which provides ___________.
• I am calling about budget proposals to invest in homelessness.
• California has the largest population of people experiencing homelessness in the nation, 24% of the nation’s total. This population has been increasing in recent years, as the costs of housing have increased, despite our communities efforts to address homelessness.
• For this reason, we need investment of $2 billion to address homelessness.
• We know what works to solve homelessness: a safe, decent, place to live, affordable to people in deep poverty.
• State investment should provide cities, counties, and non-profits who apply with the tools they need to get people housed quickly and permanently, including rental assistance, operating subsidies, capital investment, and landlord incentives, as well as services and housing for homeless youth.
• While interim interventions, like emergency shelters, can help keep people safe, they do not solve homelessness unless coupled with pathways to permanent housing. In fact, HUD defines people in emergency shelters as still homeless.
• State investment should restrict funding for interim interventions, like emergency shelters.
• Please weigh in with the Chair of the Budget Committee to support significant investment of $2 billion, and ensure these funds are used thoughtfully to reduce homelessness.

Sample E-Mails to Assemblymembers & Senators

Dear Assemblymember ____________:
On behalf of __________, I am writing in support of a $2 billion investment in addressing homelessness. California’s homeless population continues to increase due to a lack of available housing affordable to people in poverty, a 13% increase between 2016-17 alone.
As housing is an evidence-based solution to homelessness, we support ensuring State funding is used to create more housing affordable to people experiencing homelessness through rental assistance, operating subsidies, landlord incentives, and capital funding. This funding should support our community’s efforts to house the most vulnerable populations, including people experiencing chronic homelessness and homeless youth. Interim interventions, like emergency shelters and motel vouchers, are necessary for people waiting for an affordable place to live. However, State funding should primarily be used to reach real reductions in homelessness through affordable and supportive housing. Finally, we are hoping State funding requires cities, counties and non-profits to apply for funding and demonstrate a viable, sustainable plan to use funds. Cities and counties should be required to match at least a portion of the funds allocated, with the goal of leveraging local jurisdictions’ investment in addressing the crisis.
Please communicate your support for investment in housing for people experiencing homelessness to Budget Committee Chair Phil Ting. I’m attaching a fact sheet, in case helpful. Thank you for considering our request, and feel free to reach out with questions.
Sincerely,

Dear Senator _______________:
On behalf of __________, I am writing in support of a $2 billion investment in addressing homelessness, as outlined in SB 912 (Skinner/Beall). California has experienced significant increases in homelessness in recent years due to a lack of available housing affordable to people in poverty, a 13% increase between 2016-17 alone.
As housing is an evidence-based solution to homelessness, we support SB 912’s goals of ensuring State funding is used to create more opportunities to connect people experiencing homelessness to housing through rental assistance, operating subsidies, landlord incentives, and capital funding, as well as a range of housing and services supports for homeless youth. This funding should support our community’s efforts to house the most vulnerable populations, including people experiencing chronic homelessness and homeless youth. Interim interventions, like emergency shelters and motel vouchers, are necessary for people waiting for an affordable place to live. However, State funding should primarily be used to reach real reductions in homelessness through affordable and supportive housing. Finally, we are hoping State funding requires cities, counties and non-profits to apply for funding. Cities and counties should be required to match at least a portion of the funds allocated, with the goal of leveraging local jurisdictions’ investment in addressing the crisis.
Please communicate your support for investment in permanent housing to Budget & Fiscal Review Committee Chair Holly Mitchell. I’m attaching a fact sheet, in case helpful. Thank you for considering our request, and feel free to reach out with questions.
Sincerely,

Sample Letter
[ON YOUR LETTERHEAD—BE SURE TO CHANGE ALL YELLOW-HIGHLIGHTED TEXT]
May 16, 2018
Senator Holly Mitchell 
Chair, Senate Committee on Budget & Fiscal Review
State Capitol
Sacramento, CA 95814
Luan.Huynh@sen.ca.gov

Senator Richard Roth
Chair, Subcommittee on State Administration
Senate Committee on Budget & Fiscal Review
State Capitol
Sacramento, CA 95814
James.Hacker@sen.ca.gov

Assemblymember Phil Ting
Chair, Assembly Committee on Budget
State Capitol
Sacramento, CA 95814
Andrew.White@asm.ca.gov

Assemblymember Jim Cooper
Chair, Subcommittee on State Administration
Assembly Committee on Budget
State Capitol
Sacramento, CA 95814
Genevieve.Morelos@asm.ca.gov

 
Re: Support for Investment in Addressing Homelessness
Dear Senators Mitchell and Roth, and Assemblymembers Ting and Cooper—
On behalf of [YOUR ORGANIZATION], I am writing in strong support for investment of $2 billion in reducing homelessness in the FY 2018-19 budget, and for targeting that investment toward spurring local communities’ focus on proven approaches to reducing homelessness among our most vulnerable populations. [ONE TO TWO SENTENCES ABOUT YOUR ORGANIZATION]
California has the largest population of people experiencing homelessness in the nation, 24% of the nation’s total. This population has been increasing in recent years, as the costs of housing have increased. Populations with the greatest vulnerabilities, including people experiencing chronic homelessness—42% of the nation’s total—and youth experiencing homelessness—32% of the nation’s total—are increasing at faster rates than in other states. Many local governments are dedicating unprecedented resources and are housing more Californians experiencing homelessness than ever before. Yet, they simply cannot keep pace with the influx of people falling into the homeless system, people who cannot afford housing on their incomes.
We know what works to solve homelessness: a safe, decent, affordable place to live. Housing that does not limit length of stay coupled with intensive services promoting housing stability, known as “supportive housing,” is the only evidence-based intervention that allows those with significant barriers to housing stability, such as people experiencing chronic homelessness, to exit homelessness. While interim interventions, like emergency shelters, can help keep people safe, they do not solve homelessness unless coupled with pathways to permanent housing. In fact, HUD defines people in emergency shelters as still homeless.
 
Study after study shows reducing homelessness requires a long-term housing response, not an emergency response.
Toward that end, we support the following:
• Investing half of dollars allocated in capital for supportive housing for people experiencing chronic homelessness and affordable housing for low-income populations through the Multifamily Housing Program (MHP) administered by HCD.
• Increasing resources for Housing for a Healthy California, which links high-cost homeless Medicaid beneficiaries with housing and services.
• Investing in competitive grants to counties and cities who match state investment for the following:
o Rental assistance to move people experiencing homelessness to housing existing in the private market and operating subsidies to make affordable housing projects affordable enough for people experiencing homelessness through Housing for a Healthy California.
o Operating assistance, capitalized to allow affordable housing projects due to lease up in the next two years to be affordable enough to house homeless Californians.
o Contributions to flexible housing subsidy pools, which combine resources from county agencies, city housing authorities, and philanthropy to pay for rental assistance and services in supportive housing.
o Landlord incentives, such as rents while an apartment remains vacant, to encourage private market landlords to accept rental assistance.
• Investing $60 million to create a grant program to address homelessness among youth, and $1 million staff to ensure homeless youth meaningfully access resources through an Office of Homeless Youth.
• Using funds to prioritize housing for the populations in greatest need.
• Prioritizing funding for permanent housing, and limiting funding for interim interventions, like emergency shelters. Funding for interim interventions should be low-barrier, culturally competent, focused on moving people into permanent housing, and include responses other than shelters, like motel vouchers and recuperative/respite care.
• Investing a small share of funds to create a statewide data warehouse and to build and strengthen local coordinated entry systems.

Thank you for your consideration of the above. We look forward to working with you to ensure passage of this critical funding.
Sincerely,

[YOUR NAME]
[YOUR TITLE]


cc:
[YOUR SENATOR]
[YOUR ASSEMBLYMEMBER]

Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins, Chris.Woods@sen.ca.gov and Stephanie.Park@sen.ca.gov
Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, Jason.Sisney@asm.ca.gov and Katie.Kolitsos@asm.ca.gov



AIACC is Searching for an Architect to Design its New Office Space


It’s an exciting time for the AIA California Council as we explore opportunities for a new office environment in Sacramento. We need an architect to not only design a new space, but to also serve as our trusted advisor through the process. We are fortunate to have some of the very best design thinkers in the architectural profession in California and I would like to encourage you to submit your qualifications to lead the AIACC through this project. Interested? Click here for the specific details.


Trailblazing Energy Reduction Provision Adopted by the California Energy Commission


The California Energy Commission (CEC) adopted groundbreaking building standards that will prescribe photovoltaic systems on newly constructed family homes and healthcare facilities beginning January 1, 2020. This new provision may set precedence for the rest of the nation.
The new standards that have been adopted into the California Code of Regulations, Title 24, Part 6, have been impending for more than a year during the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards update process. This group of standards is the first in the nation to advise solar panels on newly built, low-rise family dwellings. The ambitious effort was developed by a collaboration between the CEC, the Statewide Codes and Standards Enhancement Program (CASE), and many other dedicated stakeholders in 2015. The standards were sponsored by California’s four Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs) and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Their reviews, comments, and ongoing dialogue throughout the three-year code cycle contributed to the conception of the code changes that will reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions—so much so that the analogy one could equate would be a similar reduction to 115,00 fossil fuel cars removed from the road.

Fundamentally, the standards will also encourage the use of high efficiency and high-performance technology systems that perform better and meet the home’s annual expected electricity needs, thus resulting in closer proximity to 2020 new home and 2030 commercial building energy use reduction goals as set forth by the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006. Some California cities, including San Francisco, San Mateo, and Lancaster, already have similar ordinances in place.

The California Energy Commission is responsible for adopting, implementing, and updating standards every three years. The California Building Standards Commission will be charged with approving the process that the CEC went through to develop the provision later in the year. Final language is anticipated to be released January 2019. The CEC has developed an FAQ on the new standards and summary documents on their cost and energy reduction analysis for new homes and non-residential buildings. Visit the CEC’s rulemaking website to see the code language and other relevant documents.
Contact Melissa Barton, AIACC Government Relations Program Coordinator, 916-642-1711 / mbarton@aiacc.org.


NATIONAL


AIA Supports Qualifications-Based Selection (QBS) process for airport projects


AIA National lobbied members of the US House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee to add the bi-partisan Westerman-Lipinski amendment to the FAA re-authorization bill (H.R. 4), which passed 393 - 13 in late April 2018. The legislation allocates about $4.34 Billion a year to major FAA programs, which includes about $3.35 Billion a year through 2023 towards infrastructure and an additional $1B a year on the Agency’s Next Generation Air Transportation System.

In accordance with the Brooks Act, the Amendment No. 6 would apply Qualifications-Based Selection (QBS) standards to any airport development project that uses federal grant funds for construction. The amendment clarifies existing rules to ensure that a uniform QBS process is followed for airport procurement projects that utilize Airport Improvement Program (AIP) funds. 

QBS has substantial benefits to project owners and the public. Studies have shown that QBS lowers overall project costs by reducing change orders during construction and minimizing long-term operations and maintenance costs. It also promotes technical innovation and empowers small firms to compete for work. QBS is endorsed by the American Public Works Association, which represents owners who procure engineering services, and is recommended by the American Bar Association in its model procurement code for state and local governments.

The organizations that partnered to support the QBS amendment included:

• Airport Consultants Council
• American Council of Engineering Companies
• American Institute of Architects
• American Road and Transportation Builders
• Association American Society of Civil Engineers
• National Society of Professional Engineers

AIA's federal team's efforts were a success and the amendment was added.

If you are interested in getting more involved with AIA National’s federal advocacy efforts, please contact Jim Brewer at jimbrewer@aia.org


For more information, please contact:


Will Wright, Hon. AIA|LA
Director, Government & Public Affairs
American Institute of Architects/ Los Angeles Chapter
3780 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 701
Los Angeles, CA 90010
(o) (213) 639-0764
email: will@aialosangeles.org
Last updated: 16-May-2018 03:02 PM
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